Baby boomers, who make up the biggest part of people who golf, are slowly aging and reaching retirement age. That really changes a lot of things demographically. Average age age of golfer is rising every year. It’s interesting to see what consequences this change will have on the sport. Majority of the seniors choose to not play golf in the winters, so they have still time for other hobbies during the winter. The fact that golf isn’t physically demanding doesn’t hurt it’s popularity level among seniors, either. There are some seniors who want to be able to golf all-year long, so they head out to warmer locations, either in US or even Mexico. Some want youthfulness, so they stay away from retirement locations altogether. But most important of all these issues, is the issue of money. Retirement locations cost a lot on their own, and golf equipment isn’t known for affordable prices, either. So today i wanted to discuss economics of playing golf in your retirement.

 Not all states in US cost the same, of course. That’s why i’ll give example of few different states to give you better perspective of what it costs to retire and play golf there. States only qualify if they have large senior population and golf courses that are high both in numbers and quality. Otherwise, it would give us skewed statistics that wouldn’t help us understand anything.

 What many seniors find out after retirement is that, playing golf every day isn’t as much fun as playing it only on weekends. You quickly get bored not only of golf, but of the whole point of retirement. Turns out, something is only enjoyable when you do it as getaway from your day job. Once it becomes your main occupation, it quickly ceases to be entertaining. I know many people who retired and then when they felt this boredom, they went back to the real world. Especially those who have the means to retire early. Turns out, spending all your time doing nothing isn’t as appealing as it may seem when you’re super busy. To combat this boredom, some people choose to be semi-retired. They still attend to, or advise some of their past businesses, but they don’t control day to day operations. Opponents to this approach think that trying to do both at the same time will result in performing poorly at both. Let’s talk about specific locations now.

 I have a friend who is retired in North Carolina. He really likes it because weather isn’t as hot as Miami, where he used to live before. He’s also one of those people who doesn’t want to spend his retirement among seniors and prefers relatively regular environment. My friend also says the vibe in NC is much more relaxed and there are less distractions.  On top of that, he and his wife both like golf courses there. The only flaw they’ve noticed is that golf courses are kind of far away. It takes them one hour by car just to get to golf course of their choice.
  I did a little bit of research on North Carolina real estate prices for this article, and it turns out they’re pretty cheap. House prices are important because when you’re retired and senior, you want to have people over for visit. Especially if you have many grandchildren. Guest rooms are essential for housing them and you should also do your best to show them good time so they are encouraged to spend time with you. Another great thing NC has going for it is it’s somewhat central locations. It’s close to all major regions on east coast – only few hours drive, at most. There is also little to no traffic and there are all the facilities they need. That, along with big houses for affordable price, makes having guests a real breeze. Back to golf-related issues, though: My friend says, even when he only plays once or twice a week, his golf skills have only improved. That’s really fascinating because logically, more practice should equal better results. In reality though, there are probably some factors we don’t see so we fail to account for them.  One of those factors, i assume, is quality of your golf clubs. There are drivers, irons, hybrids, putters, and many other clubs, but in my experience, irons are the most important towards improving your results. If you are looking for quality irons as a senior golfer, this GolfClubsGuru Guide might be helpful.
 I know i’ve compared North Carolina to Florida favorably before, but both have their advantages. For example, land and houses in Florida are even cheaper, and if you’re into warm climate, there’s no place better for you in the USA. It’s not by accident that many seniors choose to live there. Florida has everything all states have, along with benefits of low taxes, warm climate and excellent golf courses.
  The best thing about Florida is it’s community. There are so many people who retire in Florida just to be closer to these great courses that it’s really easy to socialize if you enjoy golf as much as they do. There are some special communities centered around golf courses as well, which are completely free if you live there. I see many Ads for stuff like that when watching golf-related videos. There are many other activities as well,  namely : swimming, softball, gym and many other amenities for active people.

 I’m eyeing Florida golf communities to settle there myself. The best thing about them is convenience – everything – from dining facilities to grocery stores – are super close and accessible both by walking and by golf carts. That’s what really sells the idea of living in golf community for me.

For now, i’ll finish up because these two are the only states i have information about.